Thanks And Acknowledgements

My thanks go to Kent Libraries and Archives - Folkestone Library and also to the archive of the Folkestone Herald. For articles from the Folkestone Observer, my thanks go to the Kent Messenger Group. Southeastern Gazette articles are from UKPress Online, and Kentish Gazette articles are from the British Newspaper Archive. See links below.

Paul Skelton`s great site for research on pubs in Kent is also linked

Other sites which may be of interest are the Folkestone and District Local History Society, the Kent History Forum, Christine Warren`s fascinating site, Folkestone Then And Now, and Step Short, where I originally found the photo of the bomb-damaged former Langton`s Brewery, links also below.


Welcome

Welcome to Even More Tales From The Tap Room.

Core dates and information on licensees tenure are taken from Martin Easdown and Eamonn Rooney`s two fine books on the pubs of Folkestone, Tales From The Tap Room and More Tales From The Tap Room - unfortunately now out of print. Dates for the tenure of licensees are taken from the very limited editions called Bastions Of The Bar and More Bastions Of The Bar, which were given free to very early purchasers of the books.

Easiest navigation of the site is by clicking on the PAGE of the pub you are looking for and following the links to the different sub-pages. Using the LABELS is, I`m afraid, not at all user-friendly.

Contrast Note

Whilst the above-mentioned books and supplements represent an enormous amount of research over many years, it is almost inevitable that further research will throw up some differences to the published works. Where these have been found, I have noted them. This is not intended to detract in any way from previous research, but merely to indicate that (possible) new information is available.

Contribute

If you have any anecdotes or photographs of the pubs featured in this Blog and would like to share them, please mail me at: jancpedersen@googlemail.com.

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Sunday, 4 December 2022

Victoria (1), Beach Street (Kingsbridge Street), Renaming of Royal George 1830s - 1844

Section of Powell`s Survey of Folkestone, 1782


C.P. Davis`s index card
Licensees 
George Hogben c1839 c1840 
William Lee 1841 1842 
Joseph James Jeffrey 1842 1844 
 

Previously thought to have been the house of the same name (located on South Street) it can now be stated with a fair degree of confidence that at some stage in the 1830s this was actually a change of name for the previously existing Royal George until that house was demolished in 1844. Checking the index cards compiled by the late C.P. Davies (Reference librarian at Folkestone Library) shows George Hogben listed (in Pigot`s Directory) at the Victoria, Kingsbridge Street (former name of the area in which the later Beach Street was included). Tellingly, the Royal George is NOT listed in Pigot`s Directory. The next entry on the reference card shows Jeffrey at the same address according to the Rate Book for the town in 1842. Entry No. 3 on the card has Jeffrey, but the address is now South Street in 1845. This is after Jeffrey had left the first Victoria at the time of its demolition. Any lingering doubt that this particular Victoria was a renaming of the old Royal George should be removed by the description of the location of the house as given in the evidence at the Kent Assizes in a damages case Jeffrey took out against the South Eastern Railway Company – as reported by the Maidstone Journal.

Maidstone Journal 30-7-1844

Jeffrey v The South Eastern Railway Company

Mr. Sergeant Shee, with Mr. Lush, was for the plaintiff: Mr. Peacock and Mr. Russell for the defendants.

Mr. Lush having opened the proceedings, Sergeant Shee stated the case to the Jury. The plaintiff kept the Victoria Inn, at Folkestone, and the defendants were the South Eastern Railway Company. It appeared that the Victoria Inn was the property of a family of the name of Marsh, for whom Mr. Gravenor was trustee, and as such the freehold was vested in him. The premises were rented in 1841 by a person of the name of Lee, of whom they were taken in 1842 by the plaintiff. Mr. Jeffrey had carried on the business at the Victoria for some time with great success, and was daily improving it – the maintenance of himself and family depending upon it. When common people committed depredations they were punished for it by the criminal law, but when railway companies destroyed other peoples` property they were to be treated with indulgence; although if they choose to go to Parliament, they could obtain all the powers they required to carry their intentions into effect. But when the trespass of which he complained was committed they had no such powers, and yet they had made a railroad on a turnpike road. The principal business of the inn was derived from the parties who frequented a fish market opposite the plaintiff`s. The company had thought proper to take the turnpike road and make an embankment upon it, by which means the custom of the market was for some time entirely lost to the inn. The company had afterwards made a sort of archway, by which access to the market was obtained. The plaintiff did not complain of any injury done by the workmen employed, but of the loss sustained from the circumstance he had mentioned, and by the company afterwards making a road by which the public road in front of the plaintiff`s house was reduced to nine feet wide, and his trade had been in consequence entirely destroyed. The company had not thought it worthwhile to apply to Parliament, but took the thing into their own hands, thereby depriving the plaintiff of such fair compensation as he would have been entitled to under the provisions of an Act of Parliament. If it could be proved to them that at the time this injury took place the plaintiff had been carrying on a profitable business, and was suddenly deprived of a good connection, he was entitled to fair and reasonable damages.

Mr. Wm. Lee stated that he formerly kept the Victoria, which is in the lower part of the town of Folkestone. He held it under Mr. Ham Tite, and let it on 2nd May, 1842 to Mr. Jeffrey, with the consent of Mr. Ham Tite. The plaintiff had paid him £150 for it - £75 for the goodwill and £75 for fixtures &c. There was a public road in front of the house, upon which the company had built a railroad. The house was now down. The railroad was about 5 yards from the house. There was a fish market about 25 yards in front of the house, and there were a great many persons continually passing along the road. There were a great many customers frequented the house, and by passengers calling for refreshment.

Cross-examined: He came here with the witnesses in the last cause. Mr. Robertson was attorney in both cases.

Sarah Hart stated that she was servant to Mr. Jeffrey at the Victoria Inn. Went to live there in August, 1843, before the railroad was commenced. There was a very respectable business carried on in the house. There was a fish market opposite and a great many persons came from there to the house, as well as persons walking along the road. They drank principally beer – there was a good company in the evening. About a week before she left the custom began to fall off. The dust and dirt was so great that no respectable persons would go there. She used to get a great many “vales” but the last month she had hardly any. Persons used to call them down the packets, but in consequence of the dust respectable persons would not call.

Cross-examined: When the arches were being built the fish market was removed lower down the beach. The greater number of the fishing boats were landed opposite the Victoria – the market had been removed 20 or 30 yards. The principal part of the custom that fell off were parties that came from the packets – several that used to attend from the market went to the other house. There were three or four houses the other side of the road – the Victoria was nearer to the fish market than the other houses before the road was made. The fish market stood almost the middle between the North Foreland and the Victoria – if anything it was a few yards nearer the Victoria.

Re-examined: The fish market was removed in consequence of the road being made.

Wm. Morford is a butcher at Folkestone, - he knew the situation of the Victoria. Previous to the works commencing he had frequently seen people going in there from the fish market. After that there was an obstruction, which prevented people from getting there. The embankment is so high that persons on the harbours where fish are landed cannot see the Victoria. When Mr. Jeffrey took the house he altered the bedrooms and made it more respectable for the accommodation of parties. He had supplied the house with meat, but after the works had begun the trade in steaks and chops had been gone altogether. It was never much of a house until the Dover railroad began, when the labourers working upon it frequented the Victoria.

Cross-examined: Mr. Jeffery had left the house about last May. It had been pulled down about a fortnight ago.

Re-examined: When the house was altered it was frequented by parties who came by the packets and visitors from Dover, because there was a beautiful view of the harbour from it.

Mr. Hawkins, excise officer, stated that the trade of the Victoria had considerably fallen off from the time of the tram road had commenced, which he thought was about the latter end of October.

Mr. Coomber deposed that the works commenced about September last.

Cross-examined: Was the plaintiff in the last case and had sent in the plaints which had been read.

Mr. Hawkins recalled: The trade had fallen off in spirits 3 or 4 gallons a week in each sort. He knew nothing about the beer.Persons from the fish market could get to plaintiff`s house under one or two of the arches.

Re-examined: The falling off in the first place was owing to the labour being taken off the road. The obstruction might have caused a further falling off.

By the Bench: There were not so many pleasure people in October and November as in other seasons.

John Timby deposed to the falling off in the business of the Victoria after the rent had been made.

Mr. Lee re-called: Mr. Ham Tite, the landlord of the Victoria, was a brewer and supplied the house with beer.

Mr. Peacock, in his address to the Jury, remarked upon the fact that neither the brewer nor the spirit merchant had been called, either of whom could have proved more readily the tailing off in the business than the witnesses who had been called.

The Learned Baron, in addressing the Jury, also alluded to that circumstance and said that it was the duty of the plaintiff to furnish them with the best evidence upon the plaint that he could. It would be, however, for them to award him such fair and reasonable compensation as they considered him entitled to for any loss he had sustained by the proceedings of the company.

Verdict for the plaintiff. Damages £125.

Note: No record of William Lee in More Bastions.

Canterbury Weekly Journal, Dover Chronicle 3-8-1844

Assizes: Nisi Prius Court (Before Mr. Baron Gurney)

Jeffery v The South Eastern Railway Company

Mr. Sergeant Shee (with whom was Mr. Lush) stated that the plaintiff in this case had been a licensed publican at the Victoria Inn, in Folkestone. The plaintiff carried on a most successful business. The railway company wanted communication between their railway and the harbour. When other persons than railway companies chose to break down people`s walls and destroy their trees they were indicted for it criminally, and placed in the dock, but railway companies could do an immense deal without being molested, and were allowed sometimes to do nearly as they pleased.

The ground of the plaintiff`s complaint was that his custom, which had depended very much on the fish market, and the traffic from the packets, was almost wholly cut off by the erection of the tramway, which the Company had executed without an Act of Parliament, and without any more authority than the man on the moon. They had committed a public nuisance, for which they were liable to be indicted, and in doing so they had done an injury to an individual, for which no sum that a jury would be likely to give could be considered an adequate compensation.

Mr. Peacock argued that before the opening of the railway the trade of the house was so bad that it was not worth anyone`s while to keep it open, and that the plaintiff could not prove any substantial damage. He also contended that the falling-off in the plaintiff`s trade arose principally, if not wholly, from visitors, whose attendance had fallen off as the winter approached.

Mr. Baron Gurney, in summing up to the jury, said that when a company obtained an Act of Parliament it was undoubtedly correct that they were enabled to take away men`s property, but they could even then only do so by compensating the parties under the provision of that Act. If they had got no Act they might still take property on agreement with parties. In this case it had not been shown either that the company had had any right to take the property, or that they had entered into agreement for it. The plaintiff in this case had given £75 premium for the house, and there was no question on the evidence that a very large portion of his trade had been cut off by the erection of the tramway in front of his house. It was for the jury to say to what compensation he was entitled.

The jury found for the plaintiff – damages £125.

Dover Telegraph 3-8-1844

Assizes: Nisi Prius Court

Jeffery v The South Eastern Railway Company

Mr. Sergeant Shee (with whom was Mr. Lush) stated that the plaintiff in this case had been a licensed publican at the Victoria Inn, in Folkestone. The plaintiff carried on a most successful business. The railway company wanted communication between their railway and the harbour. When other persons than railway companies chose to break down people`s walls and destroy their trees they were indicted for it criminally, and placed in the dock, but railway companies could do an immense deal without being molested, and were allowed sometimes to do nearly whatever they wanted.

The ground of the plaintiff`s complaint was that his custom, which had depended very much on the fish market, and the traffic from the packets, was almost wholly cut off by the erection of the tramway, which the Company had executed without an Act of Parliament, and without any more authority than the man on the moon. They had committed a public nuisance, for which they were liable to be indicted, and in doing so they had done an injury to an individual, for which no sum that a jury would be likely to give could be considered an adequate compensation.

The jury found for the plaintiff – damages £125.

West Kent Guardian 3-8-1844

Assizes: Jeffery v The South Eastern Railway Company

Mr. Sergeant Shee, with Mr. Lush was for the plaintiff; Mr. Peacock and Mr. Russell for the defendants.

Mr. Lush having opened the proceedings, Sergeant Shee stated the case to the jury. The plaintiff kept the Victoria Inn, at Folkestone, and the defendants were the South Eastern Railway Company. It appeared that the Victoria Inn was the property of a family of the name of Marsh, for which Mr. Gravenor was the trustee, and as such the freehold was vested in him. The premises were rented in 1841 by a person by the name of Lee, of whom they were taken in 1842 by the plaintiff, and the question would be – had Mr. Lee`s tenancy expired when they were transferred to the plaintiff?

Mr. Jeffrey carried on the business at the Victoria for some time with great success, and was daily improving it – the maintenance of himself and family depending upon it. When common people committed depredations they were punished for it by the criminal law, but when railway companies destroyed other peoples` property they were to be treated with indulgence; although if they choose to go to Parliament they could obtain all the powers they required to carry their intentions into effect. But when the trespass of which he complained was committed they had no such powers, and yet they had made a railway upon a turnpike road. The principal business of the Inn was derived from the parties who frequented a fish market opposite the plaintiff`s. The company had thought proper to take the turnpike road and make an embankment upon it, by which means the custom of the market was for some time entirely lost to the Inn. The company had afterwards made a sort of archway, by which access to the market was obtained. The plaintiff did not complain of any injury done by the workmen employed, but of the loss sustained from the circumstances he had mentioned, and by the company afterwards making a road by which the public road in front of the plaintiff`s house was reduced to nine feet wide, and his trade had been in consequence entirely destroyed. The company had not thought it worthwhile to apply to Parliament, but took the thing into their own hands, thereby depriving the plaintiff of such compensation as he would have been entitled to under the provisions of an Act of Parliament. If it could be proved to them that at the time this injury took place the plaintiff had been carrying on a profitable business, and was suddenly deprived of a good compensation, he was entitled to fair and reasonable damage.

The learned Sergeant having called witnesses in support of his statement, Mr. Peacock, in reply, argued that before the opening of the railway the trade of the house was so bad that it was not worth anyone`s while to keep it open, and that the plaintiff could not prove any substantial damages. He also contended that the falling off in the plaintiff`s trade arose principally, if not wholly, from visitors, whose attendance had fallen off as the winter approached.

Mr. Baron Gurney, in summing up to the jury, said that when a company obtained an Act of Parliament, it was undoubtedly correct that they were enabled to take away men`s property, but they could even then only do so by compensating the parties under the provisions of that Act. If they had got no Act they might still take property on agreement with parties. In this case it had not been shown either that the company had any right to take the property, or that they had entered into agreement for it. The plaintiff in this case had given £75 premium for the house, and there was no question on the evidence that a very large portion of his trade had been cut off by the erection of the tramway in front of his house. It was for the jury to say to what compensation he was fairly entitled.

The jury found for the plaintiff – damages £125.

Dover Chronicle 31-8-1844

The new hotel, which is building on the site of the “Old Victoria”, or better known as the “Old Royal George”, is getting on rapidly. It will be a splendid building, and will very much improve that part of Folkestone.

Kentish Mercury 31-8-1844

A new hotel upon an extensive scale is building by Messrs. Calvert upon the site of the old Victoria, which house was the subject of the action at the late Assizes, Jeffery v the Railway Company. The site of two adjoining houses is added to it and it will stand in a good situation for business.

Note: Appears to suggest that the Victoria had been demolished and was being rebuilt. “Extensive scale” does not match the description of the house when advertised for auction in 1870.

Dover Chronicle 22-3-1845

The splendid second-rate hotel, built on the site of the late Victoria is yet untenanted, and the tradespeople are complaining sadly owing to want of business, and not, we regret to say, without cause.

West Kent Guardian 29-3-1845

The splendid second-rate hotel, built on the site of the late Victoria is yet tenantless, and the tradespeople are complaining sadly owing to want of business, and not, we regret to say, without cause.

 


British Lion, The Bayle 1782 - Present

British Lion, 1978


Licensees

John Ladd c1782 1802 
Robert Life 1804 1806
William Life Listed 1806
William Rigden 1806 1809
Robert Formage 1809 1814
Elizabeth Formage 1814 c1817
Ann Formage 1819
Mary Weeks c1823 c1825
Edward Weeks c1825 c1828
John Crowther Listed 1839
Richard Fowle c1841 1845 (1841 Census)
Robert Burvill 1845 1862
John Taylor c1862 1876 From Eagle
William Cooper 1876 1883
Jesse Brookwell 1883 1887
James Pankhurst 1887 1912
Henry Pankhurst 1913 1929
Edward Stannard 1929 1939
Josephine Maria Stannard 1939 1939
Charles Uden 1939 1957
Richard "Gerry" Hourahane 1957 1977 From Clarendon, Sandgate
Joan Hourahane 1977 1986
Kenneth Hollett 1986 1990
Brian Clayson 1990 1994
Brian Matthews and Sandra White 1994 1999
Bruce Clark and Margaret Clark 1999 2000
Bruce Clark and Denise Grant 2000 2004 + 



Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811

General Sessions 31-1-1804

Before John Sladen (Mayor), Edward Andrews, John Minter, John Castle and John Gill

The licence of the British Lion was transferred to Robert Life.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811

General Sessions 14-10-1806

Before John Gill (Mayor), John Minter, Joseph Sladen, Thomas Baker, John Castle, John Bateman, William Knight and James Major.

The licence of the British Lion was transferred to William Rigden.

Note: This does not appear in More Bastions

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811

General Sessions 25-4-1808

Before Thomas Baker (Mayor), Joseph William Knight, John Castle, John Gill, John Bateman and James Major.

The following person was fined for having short measures in their possession, viz.:

Wm. Rigden for 1 pint 2/6

Folkestone Sessions Books 1765 – 1779 & 1792 - 1811

General Sessions 30-5-1809

Before Joseph Sladen (Mayor), John Minter, Thomas Baker, John Castle and John Gill.

Ordered that the following persons be summoned to appear at the next adjournment of the Sessions, viz.: Wm. Rigden, Charles Stebbings, John Essex (sic) and John Burton.

Rigden, British Lion. Stebbings, Marquis of Granby (1). Eastwick, Ship Inn. Burton, Jolly Sailor (2)

General Sessions 27-6-1809

Before Joseph Sladen (Mayor), John Minter, Thomas Baker, and John Castle.

William Rigden, of the British Lion, was fined for having in his possession three ale pints for selling ale or beer in the sum of 10/-, which was paid.

Kentish Chronicle 13-12-1814 

On Saturday, Mr. Robert Formage, landlord of the British Lion public house, Folkestone, aged 40 years, on his way home from Folkestone Harbour in perfect health, fell on his face and instantly expired. Medical assistance was immediately procured, but the spark of life was totally extinct. He has left a widow and a numerous circle of friends to lament their loss. 

Kentish Gazette 16-12-1814 

Death: Saturday last, Robert Formage, landlord of the British Lion public house, Folkestone. While in the act of bringing two pails of water he dropped down and instantly expired; he has left a wife to lament her loss.

Kentish Chronicle 4-7-1815 

An inquest was held in Folkestone on Thursday last, before Henry Butcher, Esq., Mayor and Coroner, on the body of Wm. Dorman, who was killed in a fray which occurred between a party of soldiers and young men belonging to that town. The jury, after a patient investigation of the circumstances returned a verdict of “Wilful Murder” against some person or persons unknown.

Kentish Gazette 4-7-1815 

On Thursday last a Coroner`s inquest was held in Folkestone, before Henry Butcher, Esq., Mayor and Coroner, on the body of Wm. Dorman, who was killed in a fray which occurred between a party of soldiers and young men belonging to that place. The jury, after a very patient investigation of the circumstances returned a verdict of “Wilful Murder” against some person or persons unknown.

Kentish Chronicle 7-7-1815 & Kentish Gazette 7-7-1815 

On Tuesday last George Dixon and John Bayley, two privates belonging to the Royal Artillery, and John Bathurst, a man of colour, belonging to the band of the 95th Regiment, were fully committed to Folkestone Gaol to take their trial for the murder of William Dorman, as mentioned in our last.

Kentish Chronicles 14-7-1815 & Kentish Gazette 18-7-1815 

The three soldiers lately committed to Folkestone Gaol, charged with the murder of William Dorman, were on Tuesday removed from thence by Habeas Corpus for trial at Maidstone Assizes this week.

Kentish Gazette 21-7-1815 & Kentish Chronicle 25-7-1815

Assizes: Crown Side, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc, Wednesday, July 19:

John Bathurst and John Bayley, two soldiers, removed by Habeas Corpus from the town of Folkestone, 11th July, were indicted, the former being charged on the oath of Ann Steady, widow, with feloniously, voluntarily, and of malice aforethought, killing and murdering William Dorman, at Folkestone; the latter being charged on his own confession of killing and murdering with malice aforethought, the said William Dorman.

Francis Payne was at the British Lion, at Folkestone, at the last fair, as waiter. The prisoner, Bathurst, came into the house and asked him whether any of the 95th were there. Witness said there were some in the dancing room, and the prisoner went in and said to them “95th turn out”. A scuffle took place and Bayley and Bathurst went out. About a quarter of an hour afterwards Bathurst came in with his back all over dirt and said “I have done for three of them”.

Thomas Kemp lived at Folkestone, and was in the street on the 29th June last at one o`clock in the morning. There were soldier and sailors in the street quarrelling. While he was speaking to Dorman (the deceased) witness saw sailors running down the street with soldiers after them. Dorman ran with the sailors from the soldiers, and witness ran up a yard. Presently he came from the yard and proceeded down the street, where he saw Dorman lying on the ground, with a rifleman by his side, kicking him with his foot and swearing at him. Witness carried Dorman into the public house. He could distinguish no persons.

Wm. Shaw was a sailor, and was in the street at Folkestone on the night of the 29th of June. As he was coming up the street he saw Bathurst cutting a staff from one of the booths. Witness went afterwards into the British Lion and saw Bathurst come in and say he had killed three men.

Ann Steady was, on the 29th June last, at Folkestone, awoke out of her sleep by a great noise; she looked out of her window and saw some soldiers beating Dorman, but could not distinguish the Black Man (Bathurst).

Mr. Justice Le Blanc addressed the jury. There was no evidence to identify either of the prisoners, and therefore they must be acquitted.

Verdict: Acquitted

Kentish Chronicle 31-8-1819 

Advertisement extract:

Valuable brewery, free public houses and other estates to be sold by auction by Messrs. White (without reserve). Pursuant to certain orders of the Vice Chancellor of Great Britain, and before the major part of the Commissioners named and authorised in and by a Commission of Bankrupt awarded and issued against Matthew William Sankey, of the city of Canterbury, brewer, dealer and chapman, at the Guildhall of the said city of Canterbury, on Wednesday, the 22nd day of September, at eleven o`clock in the forenoon (subject to such conditions of sale as shall be then and there produced).

Lot 30: A messuage called the British Lion, with the wash house, granary, garden, land and appurtenances, situate near the Bail, in the town of Folkestone aforesaid, and now in the occupation of Ann Formage, widow.

Note: Does not appear in More Bastions.

And all the above lots will be sold subject to the tenants in possession claiming their fixtures by the power of removing them, or being allowed for them by a valuation in the usual way, and to quit rents (if any).

There will be no auction duty payable.

For further particulars apply to Messrs. Plummer and Son, or Mr. J.J. Pierce, solicitors, Canterbury; or to Messrs. Wiltshire, Bolton and Cole, solicitors, Winchester House, Old Broad Street, London, at whose respective offices printed particulars may shortly be obtained.

Kentish Gazette, Maidstone Journal 19-4-1842, Dover Telegraph 23-4-1842

Auction advertisement extract: To be sold by auction by Messrs. Bayley and Reeve, on Wednesday the 14th of May, 1842, at two o`clock, at the Royal Oak Inn, Ashford (by the direction of the proprietor, who is leaving the county).

Lot 3) All that freehold public house, called the British Lion, situate on The Bayle, in the town of Folkestone, in the occupation of Mr. Richard Fowle.
 
Printed particulars and conditions may be had 10 days preceding the sale of Messrs. Robert and George Farley, Solicitors, and of the Auctioneers, Ashford

Maidstone Gazette 12-8-1845

At a Special and Petty Sessions held at the Town Hall on Tuesday last, before J. Bateman Esq., Mayor, D. Major and W. Major Esqs., and Capt. Sherren, the following alehouse licenses were transferred, viz: from Joseph Earl, of the Folkestone Lugger, to Richard Fowle; from said Richard Fowle, of the British Lion, to Robert Burvill; from William Harrison, of the Marquis of Granby, to James Hall; from said James Hall, of the Ship, to John Harrison; from James Collard, of the King`s Arms to William Smith.

Note: Transfers of Folkestone Lugger, British Lion, Marquis of Granby are earlier than previously known. Neither licensee for Ship listed in More Bastions.

Folkestone Chronicle 13-9-1856

Monday September 8th: - Special sessions were holden for the purpose of renewing licences, and granting new ones. Present, the Mayor, and G. Kennicott, S. Godden, W. Major, J. Kelcey, W. Bateman, S. Mackie, and J. Kinsford esqs.

The licences of 45 houses were renewed. The licence of the Mariner`s Home was refused, the landlord having been twice summoned, and twice cautioned, during the year, continual complaints having been made respecting it. The licence of the British Lion was deferred granting until the adjourned meeting, to be holden on Wednesday next.

Southeastern Gazette 16-9-1856

Special Sessions, Monday: Before the Mayor, T Golder, W. Major, W. Bateman, G. Kennicott, J. Kingsnorth, J. Kelcey, and S. Mackie, Esqs.

This being licensing day, 55 licenses were renewed, and one refused.

Mr. Robert Burvill, of the British Lion, Bayle, was complained of by the Superintendent, for keeping his house full of people during divine service every Sunday. The defendant said they were his men lodgers; he would endeavour to keep them out. The Mayor said Mr. Burvill had kept the house for many years, and he was sorry to hear complaints. The magistrates would grant the license on that occasion, but if any further complaint was made, it would be a serious matter to him.

Folkestone Chronicle 20-9-1856

ADJOURNED SPECIAL SESSIONS – Wed. Sept. 17th

The business was the renewal of licences of public houses to those persons who did not attend the previous sessions. We were in error in stating last week that the renewal of the licence of the British Lion had been adjourned till this meeting, the licence having been granted at the previous sessions.

Folkestone Chronicle 6-7-1861

Monday July 1st:- Before W. Major, J. Tolputt and Gilbert Kennicott esqs.

Andrew Mason and Henry Foreman were charged by police constable Ovenden with vagrancy, and being found asleep about half past two on Sunday morning, under a tent or booth belonging to Robert Burvill, of the British Lion, in the fair held in Mr. Meikle`s grounds, Broadmead Back Lane. They were searched, but nothing found upon them. Discharged with a caution.

Folkestone Chronicle 4-1-1862

Friday January 3rd:- Before the Mayor

William Thomas Hart, Mill Bay, Folkestone was brought up charged with stealing one Delft chimney ornament, value 1s., the property of Robert Burvill, British Lion Inn, The Bayle, Folkestone. The prisoner had been employed removing some forms when he took the opportunity of stealing the paltry image, which was found at his house. Prisoner was remanded until this morning.

Folkestone Chronicle 11-1-1862

Saturday January 4th. :- Before the Mayor and James Kelcey esq.

William T. Hart was brought up on remand, charged with stealing on the 2nd instant, at the house of Mr. Robert Burvill, on The Bayle, a china ornament of the value of one shilling.

Elizabeth Burvill, the wife of Robert Burvill, said prisoner was employed at the house removing some forms into a room, on the mantel shelf of which the ornament stood. The article now produced is the one which was missed after the prisoner left.

The daughter of the last witness proved she had washed the ornaments on Thursday morning; identified the one produced as the one which was missed after the prisoner had been in the house.

Police constable Smith proved on Thursday night he went to prisoner`s house; prisoner was in bed; saw the ornament now produced on the mantel, and took the prisoner into custody.

The prisoner consented to be tried by the bench, and pleaded guilty.

The Mayor, addressing the prisoner, said “You have been convicted twice before, but those convictions have not been brought against you on this occasion; it is in the power of the magistrates to commit you for three months, but they do not intend inflicting the full penalty. You are now sentenced to two months` hard labour. This makes the third conviction, and after this, it is very probable that if brought up again, you will be so dealt with as not to trouble the borough for some time”.

Folkestone Chronicle 7-6-1862

Death: June 5th, on The Bayle, Folkestone, Mr. Robert Burvill, of the British Lion.

Note: Date is at variance with More Bastions

Folkestone Observer 2-1-1864

Saturday December 26th:- Before Captain Kennicott R.N. and J. Tolputt Esq.

Thomas Graham, private in the 83rd Regiment, stationed at Shorncliffe Camp, was charged with assaulting P.C. Swain.

P.C. Swain said: Yesterday morning at a quarter to six I saw the prisoner lying flat on his back near Gosling`s shop. I roused him and tried to wake him. He was very drunk. As soon as I shook him a little and woke him up I told him to go away. He said “You ----“, and kicked me with his left foot on the neck as I was leaning over him. He partly knocked me down. He then sprang up and hit with his fists and knocked my hat off and ran away. P.C. Sharp came up at the time and we both pursued, and took him into custody on the Bayle, at the back of the British Lion, and brought him to the station.

Prisoner was dismissed with a caution.

Southeastern Gazette 8-6-1874

Inquest

An inquest was held at the Town Hall, on Saturday evening, before J. Minter, Esq., coroner, on the body of Rosetta Diana Stebbings, aged about 80.

George Stebbings, husband of the deceased, deposed: At about half-past nine last night I went to the British Lion and stayed there until about twenty minutes to twelve, and was just going home with a pint of beer for our suppers, when Mrs. Hart, who lives next door, came to me and said, “Your wife is burnt; you had better come home as soon as you can.” I went home and found deceased had been taken to the Dispensary, and on going there I found her in bed very much burnt about the face, breast, back, and one foot. I stayed there all night, deceased was sensible at times, and said a spark flew out of the fire and ignited her dress. There was a coal fire in the grate when I left deceased, who was sitting in a chair.

Mrs. Sarah Hart, who lives next door to deceased in Providence Place, Mill Bay, deposed to hearing deceased scream, and on going to her found her sitting on the floor enveloped in flames. She threw some water over her, and finding she could not extinguish the fire, she called some men, who threw more water upon her and extinguished the flames. Deceased was then taken to the Dispensary.

Mrs. Catherine Clans corroborated the last witness.

Mr. E. Mercer, M.E.C.S., deposed to attending deceased and finding her very much burnt on the face, neck, chest, back, both arms and hands, and the left foot, attended her up to three o’clock on Saturday afternoon, when she died.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

Folkestone Express 24-7-1875

Notice

Ancient Order Of Druids

British Lion Inn, Bayle, Folkestone.

July 20th, 1875

The above Order beg to intimate to the Public that they HAVE NOT authorised TOM BURTENSHAW to solicit Subscriptions for the purpose of a rural fete.

By Order of The Lodge,

T.J. Mullett N.A.

Note: It is interesting to note that the Folkestone Chronicle of this date carries this advertisement, but gives the address as the Red Lion

Folkestone Express 29-4-1876

Wednesday, April 26th: Before The Mayor and R.W. Boarer Esq.

A temporary license was granted to W.W. Cooper to sell beer at the Lion, Bayle, pending the transfer of the license.

Folkestone Express 17-6-1876

Wednesday, June 14th: Before J. Tolputt and J. Clars Esqs., and Alterman Caister.

The license of the British Lion was transferred from John Taylor to William Willis Cooper.

Folkestone Chronicle 12-1-1878

Inquest

On Saturday evening an inquest was held at the Harvey Hotel by the Coroner (J. Minter), respecting the death of Robert Burley, a member of the Borough Police Force.

James Burley, K.C.C., deposed: I identify the body as that of my brother, Robert Burley. He was a member of the Folkestone Borough Police and was 21 years of age. I saw him on Thursday last at two o`clock. He was in bed, and told me that when he came off duty on Tuesday he went out with a friend, and remained with him until three or four o`clock in the morning, leaving him at the bottom of Dover Street. On going up Dover Street a little way he ran against two artillerymen, who turned round on him and gave him a thrashing, knocked his hat all to pieces and cut his head. He found blood was running down, and went to a friend`s house and knocked, but could not make anyone hear. He then hurried home to his lodgings, and on going up to the front door fell into the area. He remembered nothing more until he found himself in bed.

William Willis Cooper, landlord of the British Lion, deposed: On Thursday afternoon I went to see the deceased. From information I received I went and asked him if he had called at my house on Wednesday morning at 3-45, and he said “Yes”. I also asked him if he went to my mother`s house at 103, Dover Street, near Radnor Bridge, the same morning, and he replied “Yes”, but did not say what for. He pointed to he left eye, and said he had been knocked about by two soldiers.

Elizabeth Cooper deposed: I am a widow, living at 103, Dover Street. I knew the deceased, Robert Burley. On Wednesday morning, about 20 minutes past four, I was in bed and heard someone come to the door. He knocked with his fist and tried the latch. I got out of bed and opened the window. I said “Who`s there?”. He said “Oh, Mrs. Cooper, will you come down? I am nearly murdered”. I replied “I don`t know who you are. You had better go home. I know nothing of you”.  He said “Thank you” and left a few seconds afterwards.

Frank Martin deposed: On Wednesday last, about twenty minutes to five, I was in bed and was aroused by some groaning, and in consequence of that I looked out of the window, and afterwards went down and saw deceased lying in the area. I then called Mr. Woodlands and we took him up to bed. He was insensible. We sent for Dr. Mercer, and he came. There was a large scar on the left eyebrow. It was not bleeding. There was no blood on his face.

Mary Ann Hayward, living at No. 6, Queen Street, deposed: I saw two artillerymen on New Year`s Day in the Bellevue Tavern. They told me they had been out all night, and had strayed away from Dover. As they had no money, my friend and I treated them to a quart of beer. The short one said he did not mean soldiering. I saw them again on Wednesday morning in the Bellevue Tavern. Jarvis told me afterwards that outside the Raglan Tavern they knocked up against a policeman between three and four o`clock in the morning.

Dr. Richard Mercer deposed: I found deceased lying perfectly insensible. He had a small graze over the left eyebrow, which appeared to have been done some time, as the blood was quite dry. I saw him again at eleven o`clock, when he was quite conscious, but paralysed below the left breast. I examined him, and found a fracture of the spine between the shoulders. There were no other marks of violence about him. I asked him if he was perfectly sober at the time, and he said “No”. He had had a little more than was good for him. Deceased died yesterday morning, the 4th instant, the cause of death being fracture of the spine, which in my opinion was caused by the fall. Supposing he had received the injury in a fight with soldiers it would have been utterly impossible for him to have got home.

The Coroner summed up, and the Jury, after putting a few questions to the Superintendent of Police, returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

Folkestone Express 12-1-1878

Last week we reported that Robert Burley, a member of the Borough police force, was seriously injured through having fallen down into the area of the house where he lodged. The poor fellow died about eleven o`clock on Friday morning. From statements made by the deceased to his brother, it seemed that before he got home on Wednesday morning he had been ill-treated by two soldiers, and in consequence of this report a considerable amount of interest was felt in the affair.

An inquest was held on Saturday evening at the Harvey Hotel, by J. Minter Esq., the borough coroner, when the following evidence was taken:

James Burley, a police constable stationed at Lyminge, identified the body as that of his brother. He deposed: His age was 21 last birthday. I saw him on Thursday last, having come to Folkestone in consequence of hearing of his accident. I found him in bed, and I asked him to tell me how it happened. He told me that when he went off duty he changed his clothes and went out with a friend. He was with him until between three and four o`clock in the morning, and left him at the bottom of Dover Street. He went up the street a little way and “ran against” two artillerymen, and they turned round and “dropped into him” and gave him a good thrashing, knocked his hat all to pieces and cut his head or eye. He found blood was running down his face and he went to a friend`s house and knocked. Thinking he could not make anyone hear, he hurried home to his lodgings. Going up to the front door he kicked his left toe against the steps. He put his right foot out to try to save himself, and that slipped on the flag stones, in consequence of his boots having steel brads in them. That threw him round on his left side, and his back came on a low wall and pitched him over into the area. He remembered no more until he found himself in bed. He did not say if the soldiers followed him.

By a juror: I believe the soldiers recognised him as a policeman.

By the Coroner: I do not know if he meant to take them into custody.

The Coroner: From what I can learn, it appears that he thought they were two men absent without leave, and he might as well have the money for apprehending them.

William Wills Cooper, landlord of the British Lion, Bayle, said: On Thursday the 3rd, in the afternoon, I went and saw the deceased. Two men having come to my house on at 3.40 on the Wednesday morning, I asked the deceased if he was one of them and he said “Yes”. I also asked him if he went to my mother`s house in Dover Street, and he said he did. He did not say what he went for. He lifted his right arm and pointed to his left eye and said he had been knocked about by two soldiers.

Mrs. Elizabeth Cooper, a widow, living at 103, Dover Street, said: I knew the deceased, Robert Burley. On Wednesday morning, about twenty minutes past four o`clock, I was in bed. I heard someone come to the door and knock with their fist, and then try the latch. I opened the window and saw a man and asked “Who`s there?” A voice replied “Oh, Mrs. Cooper, will you come down? I am nearly murdered”. I said “I don`t know who you are; you had better go home”. I could not see who it was. He said “Thank you”, and left a few minutes after. I did not know who it was, nor do I now, except from what my son has told me. The man appeared to be sober, as far as I could judge.

Frank Martin, a waiter, living at 28, Harvey Street, said: About twenty minutes or a quarter to five on Wednesday morning last I was in bed and was aroused by hearing someone groaning. I got up, went down to the front door, and looked over into the area, and there saw the deceased. He was lying on his left side, with his arm underneath him, and his hat was about a foot and a half from his head. He was insensible. I called the assistance of my father-in-law and we got deceased into the passage. We sent for Dr. Mercer, and afterwards put deceased to bed. There was a slight scar on his left eyebrow but there was no blood on his face or any part of him that I could see.

Mary Ann Hayward, a single woman, living at 6, Queen Street, said: On New Year`s Day I saw two artillerymen in the Belle Vue Inn. They told me they had been out all night, and strayed away from Dover. I told them if they did not go back they would be taken into custody. I and a friend treated them to beer, and bread and cheese, as they had no money. The short one, Jarvis, said he did not mean soldiering. They left me at half past eight on Tuesday night, when I gave them twopence to go home with. I saw them again on Wednesday morning in the Belle Vue Inn. They bid me good morning. I asked them why they did not go home, and they said they met the picquet out marching, and if they had gone further they would have been taken in. Jarvis said they were at the Raglan about half past eleven, and that they had knocked up against a policeman about three or four o`clock in the morning. The tall soldier pushed Jarvis, and motioned him to say nothing, and Jarvis laughed. They told me they were hungry and we got them some bread and cheese. About an hour afterwards I hear that a policeman had been ill-used. I asked Jarvis what he had been up to, and he got up and laughed and they both went out. One of them had told me previously that he meant murdering someone. He had had six months imprisonment and did not mean soldiering. He also said he had just had a fortnight`s confinement.

Mr. Richard Mercer, surgeon, said: On Wednesday morning between six and seven o`clock I was called to deceased in Harvey Road. I found him lying in the passage of the house, perfectly insensible. He had a small graze over the left eyebrow, which appeared to have been done some little time, as the blood was quite dry. I assisted to carry him to bed and saw him again at eleven o`clock, when he was quite conscious, but paralysed below the breast. I examined him and found a fracture of the spine between the shoulders. There were no other marks of violence whatever – no bruises or cuts. I asked the deceased how it occurred, and he said he had been spending the evening with some friends and came home about four in the morning. When he got on the doorstep his foot slipped and he fell over the wall into the area. I asked him if he was perfectly sober at the time, and he said “No, I had a little more than was good for me”. In consequence of the reports about deceased having been knocked about by soldiers I have today and yesterday again examined the body, and there are no marks of violence other than those I have described. He died yesterday morning, the cause of death being the fracture of the spine, which in my opinion was caused by the fall. Deceased knew the critical state he was in, as I told him he was mortally injured, and he made the statement to me after I had so informed him. It would have been utterly impossible for him to have got home if he had received the injury at the hands of the soldiers.

Superintendent Wilshere, who was called by request of a juryman, said no report was made to him of the constable having been attacked by soldiers, and he only heard of it accidentally. It was quite probable that he attempted to take the two men into custody as deserters. He would be doing his duty if he did so.

The Coroner said that although at first it seemed that deceased had been ill-treated, the evidence of Dr. Mercer showed that such ill-usage was not serious and did not in any way contribute to his death. Had the soldiers followed him, and had he fallen in endeavouring to escape from them, it would then have been a question whether they would not be liable to a charge of manslaughter.

The jury at once returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

It having been stated that the deceased, out of his very moderate pay, contributed towards the support of his parents, the jurymen gave their fees to be transmitted to the old couple.

Folkestone Express 17-5-1879

Wednesday, May 14th: Before W.J. Jeffreason Esq., and Aldermen Caister and Sherwood.

James Lewis was charged with being drunk and disorderly on the Bayle on Saturday evening last.

P.C. Hogben said he was sent for by the landlord of the British Lion, and found defendant kicking the door and making a disturbance.

He was fined 5s., and 3s. 6d. costs, or in default seven days` imprisonment.

Folkestone Express 28-5-1881

Monday, May 23rd: Before The Mayor, General Armstrong, Captain Crowe, Captain Fletcher, and M.J. Bell Esq.

Patrick Marns was charged with being drunk on The Bayle on Sunday, and also with begging and assaulting William Wills Cooper, landlord of the British Lion Inn.

William Wills Cooper stated that on Sunday evening at a quarter to ten the prisoner went into the house and asked the customers in the bar to give him a copper. He was drunk and witness ordered him to leave the house. He refused to go, and witness proceeded to eject him. When they reached the door prisoner clutched him and tore his shirt, and they fell together. When witness was getting up, prisoner kicked him in the eye.

Thomas Taylor, who was a witness of the occurrence, gave corroborative evidence. He followed the prisoner and gave him into custody.

Prisoner was fined 5s. and costs, or seven days` hard labour for being drunk, and for the other offences he was sentenced to 21 days` hard labour.

Folkestone Express 4-9-1886

Thursday, September 2nd: Before The Mayor, H.W. Poole Esq., and General Armstrong.

Francis Doyle, a bathchairman, was charged with being drunk and refusing to quit the British Lion on Wednesday. He pleaded Guilty and was fined 10s. and 3s. 6d. costs.

Folkestone Express 26-11-1887

Wednesday, November 23rd: Before General Armstrong, F. Boykett, J. Brooke and H.W. Poole Esqs., and Surgeon General Gilbourne.

The licence of the British Lion on the Bayle was transferred to Mr. J. Pankhurst.

Folkestone Express 17-12-1887

Wednesday, December 14th: Before Capt. Carter, J. Hoad, J. Fitness and E.R. Ward Esqs.

The licence of the British Lion Inn was transferred to Mr. J. Pankhurst.

Folkestone Express 25-4-1891

Wednesday, April 22nd: Before J. Clark, J. Fitness, J. Pledge, J. Holden and E.T. Ward Esqs.

Richard Henry Strood was charged with being drunk in Dover Street on the 15th April.

P.C. Gosby said he saw the defendant lying drunk in the street near Mr. Martin`s bootshop. With assistance he was taken to the police station, where it was found that his head was injured, and Dr. Bateman was sent for.

Defendant said he was told he fell down the Bayle Steps. He had two pints of beer at the Lion, and a glass of port wine. He was perfectly well able to walk, but remembered nothing after he fell.

Defendant was fined 2s. 6d. and 9s. costs, and ordered to pay the doctor`s fees, 7s. 6d.

Sandgate Weekly News 12-9-1896

Local News

On Thursday afternoon the body of a well-dressed female was found floating in the sea opposite the Seabrook Hotel, Hythe. As it was apparent that the body had been in the water artificial respiration was tried, but without success. The body was afterwards identified as that of a lady named Emily Farrow, aged 63, a relation of Mr. and Mrs. Pankhurst, of the British Lion Hotel, The Bayle, Folkestone, with whom she had been staying. There was nothing to show how deceased got into the water, and the inquest held on Friday was adjourned.

Sandgate Weekly News 19-9-1896

Local News

The adjourned inquest on the body of Mrs. Farrow, a visitor to Folkestone, which was found floating in the sea opposite the Seabrook Hotel, was held at Hythe on Saturday, and an open verdict was returned.